64839681 - hands holding cardboard on bokeh background with text: the gig economy

Plumber wins workers’ rights legal battle in case that could have huge implications for ‘GIG’ economy

A plumber has won a legal battle for working rights in a Supreme Court ruling expected to have huge ramifications for freelance workers. Gary Smith had worked solely for Pimlico Plumbers for six years. Despite being VAT-registered and paying self-employed tax, he was entitled to workers’ rights, the court ruled.

The ruling will be closely read by others with similar disputes, many of whom work for firms in the so-called gig economy. An employment tribunal was “entitled to conclude” that Mr Smith was a worker, the court ruled.

As a worker Mr Smith would be entitled to employment rights, such as holiday and sick pay. Pimlico Plumbers chief executive Charlie Mullins said he was “disgusted by the approach taken to this case by the highest court in the United Kingdom”.

Mr Mullins said: “This was a poor decision that will potentially leave thousands of companies, employing millions of contractors, wondering if one day soon they will get nasty surprise from a former contractor demanding more money, despite having been paid in full years ago.

“It can only lead to a tsunami of claims,” he added. Tim Goodwin of law firm Winckworth Sherwood cautioned that the ruling may not apply to other complaints.

“Even with a high level decision like this, to a degree the issue of employment status in the gig economy is up in the air.

“The government is consulting on this issue, and may bring forward legislation. So it’s quite possible that Parliament may overrule this decision within the next few months or years.”

‘Not a game changer’

And Alan Lewis, employment partner at law firm Irwin Mitchell said the decision was not a “game changer” and that cases would continue to be argued on their specific facts and, for businesses that rely on self employed contracts, that means further uncertainty.

“This decision is not necessarily a win for ‘gig economy’ workers seeking to challenge their employment status.”

Pimlico Plumbers does “not operate a gig model and the implications for Uber, City Sprint, Deliveroo etc may be limited, although the publicity around this case may encourage other ‘self employed’ contractors to challenge their legal status,” added Mr Lewis.

The Supreme Court ruling means that an employment tribunal can now proceed to examine Mr Smith’s action against Pimlico Plumbers as a worker, including a claim that he was unfairly dismissed.